Casting Announced for Greyhounds A/W 2019 Tour

Time & Again are incredibly excited to welcome five new company members! They’ll be joining us in heading back to the 1940s and performing in Greyhounds for our Autumn/Winter 2019 tour!

Greyhounds will be coming to Sheffield 9th – 12th October and Cambridge 9th & 16th November, with more dates to be added soon. You can book tickets here and here!

From left:
Samantha Vaughan – Ruby Winters
Katherine Reynolds  – Katherine Winters
Adam Martin-Brooks – Will Croft
Kendal Boardman – Nancy Wilde
Ben Hynes – Edward Holmes

We’re really excited to welcome to our new members to the company and to see them bring this story to life once again for brand new audiences.

Written by Laura Crow, Greyhounds entwines Shakespeare’s famous story of ‘warlike Harry’ with the everyday trials and tribulations of small village life during World War Two. Whilst the war rages above them, the residents of Shuttlefield village struggle to stage a production of Henry V to raise money for their local Spitfire fund.

The original cast, from the Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2018 run of Greyhounds, will also be performing for two nights of the tour.


From left:
Catherine Cowdrey – Ruby Winters
Laura Crow – Katherine Winters
Jacob Taylor – Will Croft
Fiona Primrose – Nancy Wilde
Tim Cooper – Edward Holmes

Greyhounds AW 2019 Touring Poster

OPEN CASTING CALL – New Company Members

THIS OPPORTUNITY IS NOW CLOSED

Time & Again Theatre Company are currently seeking new company members to join us on our Autumn/Winter 2019 Tour!

Audition date – Sunday 8th September, 1pm – 4pm
Audition Location – Hope Aria Academy, Hope Aria House, Unit 15 Wellington House, Manchester, M40 7FS

Greyhounds Website Header

Time & Again formed in July 2017 as a new company wishing to explore all things vintage and historical. We’ve just completed our second successful run at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and are now small-scale and rural touring both of our shows. Time & Again recently won the Oldham Coliseum Pick of the Manchester Fringe award, as well as winning an Undrowning Scholarship of $1000 back in July for our efforts in promoting women in STEM, particularly the lack of women in the aviation industry.

We are looking for 6 new company members, 3 male, 3 female.

New company members will be expected to each learn and perform two different roles – one in our 1940s show Greyhounds and one in our Edwardian show Clouds – as well as joining in with ASM and tech duties, including helping to load and unload the van, setting up the lights for each show, laying out and packing away props. The ability to drink endless of cups of tea and snack on biscuits is also preferable!

Tour dates are currently between 9th October and 3rd December 2019 so anyone applying would need good availability from the end of September onwards.
So far we have dates in Sheffield, Cambridge, and London, as well as local performances in the Manchester area. You will be required to stay overnight for some shows. Time & Again pays for and provides accommodation and travel for all shows out of the Manchester area, as well as breakfast and an evening meal.

We currently pay our company members minimum wage of £8.21 per hour on performance nights only. This covers from the moment we arrive at a venue, from unloading, setting up, performing, and packing again, to the time we leave. This is supplemented by a share of the profits (if any) on a show by show basis.

To Apply
Please email a headshot, CV, and short cover letter explaining why you would like to join the company to itslauracrow@gmail.com

Show Information

Greyhounds
Written and Produced by Laura Crow
Directed by Jacqueline Wheble

Greyhounds 12 Location

The year is 1941 and rehearsals for Henry V are underway…
Greyhounds entwines Shakespeare’s famous story of warlike Harry with the everyday trials and tribulations of small village life during the Second World War. From within the wooden O of the local village hall, where every scene is set, the residents of Shuttlefield rehearse, gossip and indulge in some seriously bad acting as the night of the performance draws ever closer.
Each character is required to perform a short monologue from Henry V during the course of the show. There are additional extracts of Henry V threaded throughout, so experience or understanding of Shakespeare would be desirable.

Greyhounds is a full length play comprising two acts each 1hr long, usually with a 20 minute interval between each act.

Character Breakdown

All roles, other than Mr Nelson, are equal in terms of stage time and importance. It’s a true ensemble piece.

RUBY WINTERS – Playing age: 25 – 40
Directing the village’s production of Henry V. Would-be bohemian; thwarted artist. Bossy but kind. Loses her sight during the show after being caught in the blast of a stray German bomb.

KATHERINE (KATE) WINTERS – Playing age: 18 – 25
Ruby’s younger sister. Reluctant participant. Quiet, awkward, extremely literal. Logical to the point of causing unintentional offence. Becomes a codebreaker at Bletchley Park during the course of the show.

NANCY WILDE – Playing age: 18 – 25
Aspiring actress, recently moved to the village from London. Cheerful, friendly, tries to be helpful. Works in the local greengrocer’s shop owned by her aunt.

EDWARD (NED) HOLMES – Playing age: 25 – 35
Former RAF pilot, currently injured. Studied mathematics at Christ’s College, Cambridge. Rather formal and traditional. High ranking official at Bletchley Park.

WILL CROFT – Playing age: 18 – 25
Playing Henry V. A devotee of literature, working in the fields. Reserved but friendly. During the play we discover he is a conscientious objector. Returns from service in the RAMC with a slight tremor in his right hand.

ARTHUR NELSON – Playing age: 45 – 65
Ruby’s cantankerous lodger. Fought in the First World War. He only appears in the second act of Greyhounds but it’s still a sizeable part.

Clouds
Written and Produced by Laura Crow
Directed by Jacqueline Wheble

Brown Group Shot

The year is 1913 and women are rising up…
Winifred Baxter is determined to become the first Englishwoman to enter an air race, learning to fly amidst the chaos of the suffragette movement, a glorious garden party and far too much nephology: the study of clouds.
Our only set is a large mockup of an Edwardian monoplane so performers must learn how to assemble and take apart the plane quickly as part of the show. In Edinburgh we managed to do this in less than 3 minutes each night, though on tour we’ll have considerably more time!

Clouds is a one act play lasting 1 hour.

Character Breakdown

All roles are fairly equal in terms of stage time and importance. It’s a true ensemble piece.

PHILIP BROOK – Playing age: 25 – 35
An aviator with a high opinion of himself. Seems to be a typical product of a male-dominated society to begin with but he becomes invested in Freddie’s efforts to enter the race. Obnoxious yet charming.

SYLVIA LOVEJOY – Playing age: 18 – 25
A budding Suffragette with an innocent view of the world. Likes to grow flowers. Always talking, incredibly naive, accidentally humorous. Drives the pace of the show along with Philip. Extremely likeable.

FREDDIE (WINIFRED) BAXTER – Playing age: 18 – 25
Determined to become the first female pilot to fly around Britain in an air race. Hot-headed and rather cutting, but able to win the sympathy of the audience. Her health declines rapidly throughout the course of the play.

THEODORE BAXTER – Playing age: 18 – 25
Freddie’s older brother. Stutters badly and is obsessed with Nephology; the study of clouds. Shy and sympathetic. Fond of Sylvia.

LADY SARA FITZMAURICE – Playing age: 25 – 40
Married to Sir Hugh Fitzmaurice who owns the Blackburn monoplane flown by Philip and Freddie. Visitor to the local hospital and organiser of a garden party. Seems snobby and rude initially but a more understanding character emerges.

The parts usually double as follows;
Ruby Winters and Lady Sara
Katherine Winters and Freddie Baxter
Nancy Wilde and Sylvia Lovejoy
Edward Holmes and Philip Brook
Will Croft and Theodore Baxter
Mr Nelson and Light and Sound

 

Letters from the Home Front – Edinburgh Diary Day 11

Saturday 11th August 2018

Amazingly, given the fact that half the Greyhounds stayed up partying and singing Hey Mr Miller in the local takeaway until the small hours the night before, we actually managed to get out of bed on Saturday morning and have a somewhat productive day. I even met a friend for some much needed coffee and managed to have a full conversation with her like a functioning human being in what was a truly Oscar worthy performance. In other award worthy performances, apparently Catherine did a stunning rendition of Cool and the Gang’s ‘Celebrate’ in the shower, but sadly I was either out or dead to the world so missed it. Here’s hoping that there will be a reprise!

Most of the rest of our day was pretty much par for the course – flyering, flyering, eating, and more flyering. We managed to get another slot on the stage after a minor drama in which it appeared that a fire engine was going to attempt to drive up the Royal Mile – you know, that completely deserted and never at all busy road that doesn’t have 3 street stages on it. Once the stage had been moved a whole foot to the right (presumably to try and accommodate this fire engine that must have been lost), we treated the Mile to some jolly 40s tunes whilst Jac did a sterling job of rallying the crowds and throwing a few era-appropriate shapes with Tim and some eager spectators.

We didn’t have long to revel in the swing-dance spirit, as Jac, Paul, Laura and Tim headed off to catch a performance of the Dad’s Army Radio Show, accompanied by a spot of afternoon tea. Laura was very cynical going in as she’s a lifelong fan of the TV show. However, they perfectly captured the essence of the show from the incidental music used during the scene changes to the delivery of over 15 different characters between two actors (including the famous seven). David Benson’s Sergeant Wilson and Jack Lane’s Private Pike were absolutely spot on. The team were somewhat perturbed by the lack of cake but the scones were absolutely delightful.

cakes

Anthony’s last Edinburgh Fringe performance with us went down a treat with our lovely audience. We’re very grateful that he was able to step in and do such a cracking job with the part, even after we nearly broke him the night before by making him come to the Hive (til 5!) with us.

A few well-earned drinks in the bar later, and it was home time for some of us early birds (me, who’d been a little bit too much of a night owl the night before…). However, the Space launch party beckoned for those feeling rather more lively amongst us. Space lanyards proudly on display, the rest of team Greyhounds went to dance the night away to the marvellous live band and celebrated what has so far been a truly spiffing Fringe experience.

Until next time,

Fiona

(Nancy Wilde – Greyhounds)

 

Reviews from the Home Front – Dulce Et Decorum Est: The Unknown Soldiers

Dulce Et Decorum Est: The Unknown Soldiers by Polymorph Theatre was a captivating two-person historical drama performed at theSpace Triplex. The year is 1941, two strangers are united as they take shelter from an air raid. Tommy is a World War One veteran; haunted by his past as he saw the rest of his regiment wiped out in the Battle of the Somme in 1916. Ellen, a young American woman, is awaiting word of her fiancé who has gone to war. They confide in each other in this confined space, sharing their stories and slowly realising that they may have more of a connection than they thought.

dulcea5.jpg

The premise of the play piqued our interest, rocketing the show to the top of our illustrious ‘shows to see’ board before we even realised we were next-door neighbours as well as WW2-show-buddies! The interweaving stories of the two World Wars is something we’ve not seen explored in any other play here at Edinburgh Fringe. It was a really interesting to hear the two experiences compared and contrasted and the characters’ perspectives on the other’s experiences.

Emilie Maybank (Ellen) did a wonderful job of capturing and portraying the feeling of being the one left behind and the agony of not knowing the fate of a loved one. Meanwhile, Jan van der Black gave a powerful and emotional performance as Tommy. Particularly poignant was his tale of going over the top with his pals at the Somme. You could truly believe that he had been there and seen the horrors of war.

The theatre space lent itself well to the setting of a make-shift shelter, with its low ceiling and intimate seating. The set design was simple yet effective, with period appropriate props pulled out of an up-turned vintage tea chest (almost identical to the one tucked away in our Greyhounds set!).

I’d be really interested in seeing more work from Polymorph Theatre in the future as Dulce Et Decorum Est: The Unknown Soldiers was such an evocative piece of historical theatre with beautiful detail. Jolly good show chaps!

Reviews from the Home Front – Dear Lucy

With 2018 marking the centenary of the end of the First World War, it is no surprise that this year’s Edinburgh Fringe has many shows based on the Great War. Dear Lucy… by Flying High is one such show. Part of their Heritage Lottery funded project, ‘Then & Now: Rebuilding lives after the Great War’, Dear Lucy… focuses not on the conflict itself but rather its aftermath as the Lucy of the title has to pick up the pieces of her life which is shattered by the news that both her brother and fiancé were killed in action.

dear lucy

The stage was adorned with poppies, old photographs, and letters to Lucy which were read aloud, transporting us back to 1918. This set a very poignant and sentimental tone which remained throughout the play, which featured contemporary dance, music and scenes of family life after the war, which were beautifully acted. I liked how female-focused this production was, as they explored women’s roles following the end of the war and female friendship. The family relationships portrayed – particularly between the sisters – felt real and well observed. All the actors did well with the multi-roling that this play required, creating characters that were distinct and believable.

My favourite storytelling device used by Dear Lucy… however was the recorded interviews. The play is very much a family affair as it is based on a true story, with Lucy being played by the real Lucy’s great granddaughter, and interspersed between the scenes were clips of recorded conversations with Lucy’s grandchildren. I love hearing people’s family stories, and the inclusion of these memories were heartwarming and made Lucy seem that much more real to the audience. It is clear that she was adored by her family, and the show was lovely tribute to her.

Letters from the Home Front -Edinburgh Diary Day 9

Thursday 9th August 2018

We had a busy schedule planned with lots of shows to see. The day started with us hot-footing it down to theSpace on the Mile to try and grab some last minute tickets for Noel Coward’s Still Life. However, it was all sold out! It wasn’t a wasted trip into town though, as we decided to head into the heaving crowds up on and around the mile and hand some flyers out before our next show of the day.

boys

Next up was Dulce Et Decorum Est: The Unknown Soldiers at theSpace at Triplex. It transpires that the company are staying right next door to us so we thought it jolly good form to go catch our neighbours’ show, especially as it’s also set in World War II! There were some lovely parallels between The Unknown Soldiers and Greyhounds, right down to the vintage tea-chest that sits proudly in the set of both shows.

Coming out of the show, Fiona’s grumbling stomach reminded us that we’d been so enthralled in the day’s activities that we’d forgotten to factor in time for lunch. Laura and Tim dashed off to grab some pasta whilst Fiona, Jacob and I rushed to theSpace on Niddry Street for Dear Lucy. We enjoyed the WWI show but I do hope the performers weren’t put off by our vocal tummies desperate to make themselves known. When back out on the street, Jacob, Fiona and I were on the prowl for some fast and filling food. The golden arches were looming. We accepted our fate and joined Ronald in a triumphant feast of burgers and fries. Meanwhile, Laura and Tim found director Jac and techie Paul and went to a performance of Dick Barton: The Tango of Terror by the Television Workshop Salford. Always great to support a fellow Greater Manchester production!

We reconvened on the Royal Mile, where Laura whipped out her ukulele and we did some impromptu close harmony singing for those passing by. Pretending to be The Andrews Sisters is definitely one of my favourite pass-times. It’s a shame we’ve only got four songs down at the moment!

Then it was time for another performance of Greyhounds. We seem to be racing through this run of shows at an alarming rate, it seems only yesterday we had those first night jitters. Another appreciative audience greeted us which was so lovely. We’re ever so grateful for the reception we’re receiving at the Fringe!

One of the great things about the Fringe is being able to go see a plethora of shows at almost any hour of the day. Tonight was the turn of The House of Edgar – a deliciously dark musical about Edgar Alan Poe. Post-performance, we trooped up to Greenside @ Nicholson Square which was bathed in green light. Here’s a snap of Jacob and Fiona having an absolute whale of a time before it was time to go and take in the show.

best friends

The House of Edgar is an absolute must-see if you’re here at the festival. Such good music and physicality. We were riding high on the spirit of musical theatre and decided that when back at the apartment, we should pop a musical on the TV. We searched various streaming services to seek out a good musical. And there it was. Chicago. Amazingly, it was Tim’s first viewing of it (which makes me even more grateful for him putting up with our exuberant performances of the Chicago numbers on the way up). We sang and danced our way along, apart from Cell Block Tango, where Fiona hushed us all to take in the masterpiece. What a jolly lovely way to spend the hours after the show!

Reviews from the Home Front – I, Sniper

I, Sniper tells the true story of soviet sniper Lyudmila Pavlichenko, deemed one of the deadliest female snipers in history. Plucked from obscurity as a teenage mother, she joins the red army and fights to take on the traditionally male task. This was an aspect of World War II history none of us knew very informed upon so we were interested to find out more from the Scotland-based student group from Acting Coach Scotland

isni

The play opens in a powerful fashion, with rows of young women marching in military uniform and responding to the barks of their commander in Russian. This instantly sets the evocative tone of the piece and establishes its context in a very clear way.

The story is told in a candid diary-like style, drawing the audience into her story. This clues us into her thoughts, feelings and emotions throughout her wartime journey, helping to ensure that the character of Pavlichenko is sufficiently humanised. The lead role is passed amongst the predominantly female ensemble cast, with each actor’s portrayal impressively as strong as the next. They use the clever device of pinning a military medal on and tucking their hat into their belt so that the audience is left in no doubt as to who is portraying Pavlichenko at present.

This is a very slick and well-rehearsed production which totally hits the target. Coming out of the production, I felt well-informed about an aspect of history I’d never explored before and like I wanted to research more myself. An impressive feat for the production indeed!